Carnival Host (still) wanted…

Carnivalesque ButtonFor the upcoming early modern edition of Carnivalesque in early February.

If you’re interested in all things early modern (c.1500-1800) and think you might like to take it on, email me: sharon@earlymodernweb.org.uk

Pseudonymous bloggers welcome.

Please don’t make me beg…

UPDATE: Post filled! More information later.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Carnival, Early Modern. Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Carnival Host (still) wanted…

  1. Claire says:

    This is a bit of a blatant abuse of your blog, but would any readers with a ready copy of these books mind looking up some page numbers for me?

    Antony Griffiths ‘The Print in Stuart Britain’ On which page does he mention a series of prints called the Elements?

    Richard Sharp ‘The engraved record of the Jacobite movement.’ In one chapter he explores the use of Jacobite portrait prints as propaganda. What are the page numbers for the chapter?

    Tessa Watt ‘Cheap print and popular piety.’ or Sheila O’Connell ‘The Popular Print.’ On what page does either author mention the low survival rate of 16th and 17th century woodcuts?

    I’m just asking on the off chance that one of your readers has these very popular books in a pile on their desk as they read this.

  2. Sharon says:

    Are any of them in Google Print or Amazon’s text search?

  3. Sharon says:

    Google Print (or Google Book Search as it is now) has Watt’s book. First mention is at p.42, but there are a couple more after that. You’ll need to register if you haven’t already, in order to view the pages (but it’s well worth doing!).

    http://books.google.com/books/

    No luck with any of the others though.

  4. Claire says:

    Ahh thanks. :) That’s one problem out the way. I’ve decided to pester my old uni librarian for the other references. I thought I was so careful to check all the page numbers as well!!

  5. Claire says:

    Hooray! Uni librarian came up with answers for me.

  6. Sharon says:

    Good to hear it. Librarians are cool, cool people. (And archivists too.) :)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s