Digital history blogs

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I compiled a quick list very recently for someone who was looking for introductions to digital history and people doing digital history work. And having done it, I thought I might as well share it.

Firstly: in one respect, this is a broad tent – some of these people are strictly speaking in literature or historical linguistics. But the boundaries are fuzzy, and what they’re doing is relevant to historians’ research too.

Secondly: but in another, it’s a fairly narrow subset of digital historians who blog – people who are posting about digital tools and techniques that they’re using, things they’re building, practical hacks and code, reflections on the process and the results they’re getting from doing those things.

Thirdly: it was put together very quickly from my RSS feeds and Twitter favourites. Who am I missing? (Feel free to plug your own blog.) What group blogs should be included?

  • Bill Turkel – “computational history, big history, STS, physical computing, desktop fabrication and electronics”
  • Tim Sherratt – “digital historian, web developer and cultural data hacker”; Invisible Australians
  • Adam Crymble – large-scale textual analysis; 18-19th century London
  • John Levin – mapping and visualisation; 18th-century London
  • Jean Bauer – database design and development; late 18th/early 19th-century USA
  • Jason Heppler – hacking/scripting (Ruby evangelist); 20th century USA
  • Caleb McDaniel – hacking/scripting; American abolitionism
  • Chad Black – hacking/scripting; early Latin America
  • Lincoln Mullen – databases, R; religion in 18-19th-century America
  • Fred Gibbs – mapping, metadata, textmining; medieval/early modern medicine and science
  • Jeri Wieringa – textmining; American religious history
  • Ben Brumfield – crowdsourced transcription software (software developer, family historian)
  • Heather Froehlich – corpus linguistics; early modern drama and gender (lit/lang)
  • Ted Underwood – “applying machine learning algorithms to large digital collections” (lit)

Not recently active so I nearly forgot about them…

Because I really do have a terrible memory (sorry…)

More via Twitter (thanks @paige_roberts, @wynkenhimself)

From comments (thanks!)

Labels are a bit random, I know: just for a flavour of what people do. Tidying up might happen later.

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