British Academy event on research outside universities

This evening event in London on 27 June may be of interest to some readers: Who’s Creating Knowledge? The challenge of non-university researchers

Is the university the primary site for the creation and authorising of knowledge? That is commonly the conventional view. But in practice large numbers of independent and non-academic researchers are enthusiastically engaged in the production and establishment of knowledge outside university walls. The panel will discuss the issues raised by the work of these often ‘invisible’ creators of knowledge, operating as they do across a wide diversity of fields of research, from family history to ornithology, astronomy to biography, philosophy to archaeology – and much else. Do such researchers present a challenge to the still often-assumed monopoly of the university over the production and validation of knowledge? Despite the obstacles they face are they perhaps following a more open route to knowledge production than in the increasingly constrained setting of university research today? Do we need to rethink the central role of the university in the establishment of knowledge? And may important new processes of knowledge-creation be emerging through the interactive potential of the internet for bypassing established university controls and evading the traditional gatekeepers to the publication and dissemination of knowledge?

Attendance is free but space is limited and you need to book a place. (And apparently there are free drinks afterwards…)

I don’t think I’ll be able to travel down and attend, but it’d be great if it could be blogged, so if anyone who doesn’t have a blog would like to go along and report on it, I’d be willing to post their reports and/or provide an open comment thread for people’s thoughts (and for links to any discussions on other blogs).

4 thoughts on “British Academy event on research outside universities”

  1. Hmmm, shame I can’t attend. I wonder if there will be any discussion about how the digitization of primary source collections aids non-university research by diminishing, at least in some cases, the importance of physical access to proprietary archives.

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